Monday, March 18, 2019

Laughing Buddha by RavenGrass

Laughing Buddha is, big surprise, an uplifting strain as its terpene profile is dominated by terpinolene.

Click to view the video.  Full review article below.



Today’s sample of Laughing Buddha (LB; sample LB002) was grown by Raven, an INDOOR cannabis farm in Olympia, WA, was harvested on December 17, 2018 as the package label, almost overlooked (bottom of jar), indicates. State-mandated testing indicated 23.31 percent Total Cannabinoids. Here’s how it rated with SeattleBliss.com.

1. Environmental Stewardship (0 / 5). Indoor cannabis is pretty, but the electricity required to produce it is very costly.  Indoor operations pay large sums for electricity to flower plants under controlled conditions. The market supports the price point at this time, but that may change if sun-grown cannabis comes into fashion with general consumers as it has with connoisseurs.
2. Freshness (5 / 5).  The freshest buds are the best, so since the soonest a producer can get high-quality buds to the retailer is 1 month, a sample being evaluated at 1 month is at its best.  Most of our field ratings will take place at exactly 1 month after harvest as producers are packaging the product.
3. Terpenoids quantified on the Label (5 / 5).  Label has the four most dominant terpenes (those most responsible for LB’s unique aroma) quantified on the label, plus total terpenes, which is extremely helpful in Washington since consumers are not allowed to sniff the goods before purchase.  A more detailed list, or a graphic could help the consumer understand what they’re purchasing.
4. Producer uses “True Earth” techniques (5 / 5) to achieve what would be called “USDA Organic” and details much on their product labeling.  Producer also welcomes and stands ready for a Seattle Bliss Tour.
5. Grower has hosted or welcomes a future Seattle Bliss tour and inspection (5 / 5).
All producers are given benefit of doubt until decided otherwise.  This means every grower gets these 5-points until we decide at our sole discretion that the points are not deserved.  A brief tour demonstrates compliance with laws and improves consumer confidence.
6. Cannabinoids Labeling, one quantity missing; (4 / 5).  THC is listed on the label at 17.42%, which is actually Total THC (a calculated value). The average consumer wants to know Total THC and will be satisfied to have it accurately presented as such. For the sake of clarity to the consumer (not just what the law requires), a perfect five out of five would indicate a very informative label that has no less than FOUR of the following: 1) CBD, CBD-A, or Total CBD, 2) THC and/or THC-A, 3) Total THC, and 4) Total Cannabinoids (Lacking space?  FOUR ITEMS: CBD, THC, Total THC, and Total Cannabinoids) clearly and accurately quantified. CBG, CBN, etc. may be included on the label as a bonus.  Lastly; Though it may seem a great deal of labeling, best practices for this jewel would list THC-A, THC, Total THC, Total CBD (zero for this strain), CBG-A, CBG, Total CBG, and Total Cannabinoids.
7. Terpene Presence (5 / 5) is evaluated with the First Sniff and is indicative of Concentration as an undetectable sample would rate at 0 and a very strong one at 5.  Standard sniff evaluation includes the combined sniffing of the newly opened container AND subsequent grinding of 1 gram and sniffing the freshly-ground product. This step is for evaluating the whole buds in the newly opened container. The sample was purchased in a 3.5g size. Terpene Presence was rated 5 out of 5 and the aroma bears a spicy, freshness reminiscent of cloves, Eastern cooking and incense. 
8. Product Purity is evaluated with the First Sniff and Microscopy (5 / 5).  Any impurities may cause an unexpected odor, but should be detectable under the microscope.  None were detected via either detection method.
9. Product Color (5 / 5).  The intensity of green color in the epidermis of cannabis flowers is an indicator of plant vigor, which could be due to nitrogen availability during late flower, and translates to elevated chlorophyll concentration (R.C. Clarke, 1981). The more white flowers have matured and cured slowly, then allowed chlorophyll harshness to dissipate. Flowers white with trichomes can achieve top ratings here, too. Product is evaluated again for smoothness in the final smoking steps.
10. Product Quality is evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  Points can be lost for male flower sites (more common recently due to the feminized seed market), insect or animal evidence, abusive handling, etc.  One 2.5 mm, pale, somewhat soft, unfertilized seed was found in this sample.  A hard, fertilized seed, or more than one would have cost points in this category.
11. Product Moisture is also evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  The most ideal buds, this sample inclusive, are sponge-like, mostly dry, but a little bit sticky.  The consumer will be able to open a bud, spreading the seedless bracts to reveal and snap the central stem without breaking the bud.
12. Trim Quality (5 / 5).  Sample has had all sugar leaf stems, most pistils and all leaf matter removed; bud stems < 3 mm.
13. Trichome Density (5 / 5).  Flower is densely covered with capitate stemmed glandular (CSG) trichomes.  This degree of density is exactly as it should be for this strain.
14. Harvest Timing (5 / 5).  Over 66% (two thirds) of glandular heads are milky-white or turning amber, Less than 33% (one third) are dark amber in color; few clear:  5.
15. Terpene Presence, 2nd Sniff (5 / 5).  This step is for evaluating the freshly-ground buds and should garner a higher rating than the first sniff of the buds (unless both rate 5).
16. Smoke Terpene Presence, 1st, 2nd taste (4 / 5).  Sample was rated only upon how fragrant the smoke was; not how well it was liked, though it was most delicious.
17. Smoke Smoothness was rated (5 / 5) with no undesired pops, crackles, or unavoidably fast/hot smoke to affect this score.
18. Smoke Pleasantness, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  This evaluation criterion exists because some buds taste/ smell like feces, hay or vomit, perhaps a pesticide or soil amenity influences the taste; the pleasantness of the whole smoke requires rating.
19. Effectiveness (5 / 5).  Dutch Treat being a THC strain with no CBD was quite effective. A rating of five in this case indicates a high potency.
20. Price-Value Rating (PVR), (3 / 5).  PVR is calculated based on the price per gram versus the calculated average price regardless of potency.  As is the case with this sample, those under the average earn the full 5 points, while those equal or above the average price earn according to the richness of the value.  This one, at $12.29 per gram, was just a bit above the average price of $11, so its calculated Price-Value Rating is 3.

This sample earned an overall rating of 91 out of 100 possible points.  Outdoor cannabis operations, greenhouse grows and those with light-deprivation greenhouses impose a much smaller carbon footprint on the Earth.  This indoor operation could earn up to 5 points on the Seattle Bliss scale by powering its operation with solar, wind, or other green solution. The Producer could provide more detail in listing cannabinoids and terpenoids (as described in items 3 and 6 above), and possibly some easy-to-interpret graphs on its label.

Links:

Seattle Bliss-Reviewed Washington Producers (Google Maps above)
Ravengrass.com
Laughing Buddha by Quincy Green (LB001; 2018 Review; pre-Seattle Bliss scale)

Featured Subscriber:
John’s Northwest Adventures – John is a guide, photographer, film maker and creates some “high” quality HD scenic videos on his YouTube channel.  It’s worth a look if you’re up for an HD adventure in the Pacific Northwest.

Photo Gallery:
Click to enlarge; copy and share.




Want to help keep Seattle Bliss independent and able to produce more content like this?  ANY goods purchased through our Amazon links benefit the Seattle Bliss mission - to help consumers obtain better cannabis.  Click on any of our links, and buy the things you usually buy - or you can buy the item shown.  It all helps.


Friday, March 8, 2019

Peppermint Cookies by Gold Leaf Gardens review

FULL SESH video below includes the review.  The full, written review follows below.  Enjoy.


Today’s review evaluates Peppermint Cookies, a branded discovery of an extraordinary Thin Mint Girl Scout Cookies (GSCtm) plant by Gold Leaf Gardens , an indoor producer growing great cannabis in Lacey, Washington. Lux pot shop had a 3.5 gram jar for $57.75, while adding the 3.5 gram pack of five joints was another $46.25 (receipt image below).

1. Environmental Stewardship (0 / 5). Indoor operations can conceivably control every variable in cultivating horticultural perfection, but they pay huge amounts for electricity. The cost of that electricity and its carbon footprint is passed on to, and rests firmly on the shoulders of the consumer. Sadly, current prohibitions and fears prevent many urban producers from exposing their plants to the sun with solutions as simple as a rooftop or back-lot greenhouse.

2. Freshness (5 / 5).  The freshest buds are most often the best. As stated above, the brand is very popular, so freshness was not an issue.  The reviewed batch was harvested August 20, 2018 and purchased January 2, 2019 (~4.3 months).

3. Terpenoids were not quantified, nor qualitatively presented on the Label (0 / 5).

4. Producer did not disclose pesticides on the label.  However, the packaging bears the “Clean Green Certified” logo, which indicates they will pass our scrutiny as well (5 / 5).

5. Producer has never responded to Seattle Bliss requests for information. It is therefore assumed that a tour of their facility would be less than welcome (0 / 5).

6. Cannabinoids Labeling, two quantities missing; (3 / 5).  The average consumer wants and needs to know Total THC and Total CBD.  These totals are calculated values based on the loss of the ‘acid’ stub by shedding CO2, and sure enough Total THC is always just a little bit less than THC + THC-A.  Consumers may also care to know how much of each of these active substances were still in the inactive, acid form. The law in Washington requires all four of these to be clearly and accurately quantified. Total Cannabinoids, CBG, CBN, etc., are not required, but may be included on the label as a bonus to the consumer.  This label listed “THC: 23.06% CBD: 0%”, which fails to identify whether quantified THC is actual THC, THC-A, or calculated Total THC.

7. Terpene Presence (5 / 5) is evaluated with the First Sniff and is indicative of Concentration as an undetectable sample would rate at 0 and a very strong one at 5.  Standard sniff evaluation includes the combined sniffing of the newly opened container AND subsequent grinding of 1 gram and sniffing the freshly-ground product. This step is for evaluating the whole buds in the newly opened container. The first sniff from the jar was very fragrant.

8. Product Purity is evaluated with the First Sniff and Microscopy (5 / 5).  Any impurities may cause an unexpected odor, but should be detectable under the microscope.  None were detected via either detection method.

9. Product Color (5 / 5). Buds were very white with trichomes covering epidermal patches of purple amidst golden brown; very pleasing.

10. Product Quality is evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  Points can be lost for male flower sites (more common recently due to the feminized seed market), insect or animal evidence, abusive handling, etc.

11. Product Moisture is also evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  The most ideal buds, this sample inclusive, are sponge-like, mostly dry, but a little bit sticky.  The consumer will be able to open a bud, spreading the seedless bracts to reveal and snap the central stem without breaking the bud.  No exception here.

12. Trim Quality (5 / 5).  Sample had all sugar leaf stems, most pistils and all leaf matter removed; bud stems < 3 mm.

13. Trichome Density (5 / 5).  Flower was densely covered with capitate trichomes.

14. Harvest Timing (5 / 5).  Most trichome heads were white and opaque with a hint of amber here and there; Perfect timing.

15. Terpene Presence, 2nd Sniff (5 / 5).  This step is for evaluating the freshly-ground buds and should garner a higher rating than the first sniff of the buds (unless both rate 5). The aroma was dominated by caryophyllene, with something else expressing freshness – probably menthol as it is the dominant terpene of peppermint (piper x mentha; also a hybrid).

16. Smoke Terpene Presence, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  Sample is rated only upon how fragrant the smoke is; not how well it is liked.  This sample was most delicious.

17. Smoke Smoothness was rated (5 / 5) with no undesired pops, crackles, or unavoidably fast/hot smoke to affect this score.

18. Smoke Pleasantness, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  This evaluation criterion exists because some buds taste/ smell like feces, hay or vomit, perhaps a pesticide or soil amenity influences the taste; the pleasantness of the whole smoke requires rating.

19. Effectiveness (5 / 5). This strain, like all other GSCtm, is considered uplifting by some, and sedating by others.  This branded strain appears to originate from the same source as GSCtm (perhaps Purple Kush and Durban Poison).  I found it very effective.

20. Price-Value Rating (PVR), (2 / 5).  PVR is calculated based on the price per gram versus the calculated average price regardless of potency.  As is the case with this sample, those above the average price earn less.  Those equal or under the average get the full five points.  The average price at the time of this review was $11.00 per gram.  The five-joint pack, which sold for $13.21 per gram, was used for rating here as the jar, at $16.50 per gram, gave a PVR of zero.

This sample earned an overall rating of 80 out of 100 possible points.  Outdoor cannabis operations, greenhouse grows and those with light-deprivation greenhouses impose a much smaller carbon footprint on the Earth than indoor operations.  Though this indoor grower may not be in a position to use less electricity at present, they could improve their Seattle Bliss rating, comply with existing laws and satisfy the desires of their consumers by making a few changes.

The Producer could easily satisfy the consumer’s desire to know exactly what they are consuming by proactively printing an annually verified terpenoid profile on their package label to earn another 5 points.  Responding to requests for product information can begin to earn some points; a tour/inspection wouldn’t hurt either.  Also, other states have their own requirements, but Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) rules state ALL FOUR of the following are required:  “THC concentration (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol) listed as total THC and activated THC-A and CBD concentration (cannabidiol) listed as total CBD and activated CBD-A” (WSLCB rules, https://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=314-55-105 WAC Section 2, a, iv, E).

NOTE: The rules have errors.  Activated THC-A is THC, and activated CBD-A is CBD.  When transcribing these values from the lab report onto your label it is best to transcribe each exactly as the lab has it listed.  THC is activated THC, THC-A is the non-activated, acid form of THC, and so on with CBD.

Gold Leaf Gardens can make the adjustments itemized here and not only score better on our review, but they’d likely improve consumer satisfaction with little or no additional cost.

Enjoy the images; Copy and share.














Saturday, February 23, 2019

2019 Dutch Treat by Quincy Green reviewed; SESH with Hope

Today’s sample was grown by Quincy Green, an outdoor and light-deprivation greenhouse operation that’s producing exceptional cannabis in an unused corner of a potato farm just outside Quincy, Washington.  Thanks to them and to Ganja Goddess, the SODO retailer who had the goods on hand.  I paid $40 for a 3.5 gram package harvested almost twelve months before my purchase (harvest date 11/17/17) and packaged only a month before purchase.  That’s eleven months of slow drying and curing for this one.

(Learn more about Oxidative Degradation of THC into CBN in Stored Cannabis)



1. Environmental Stewardship (5 / 5). Sun-grown cannabis, whether produced in full exposure to wind and rain, or enclosed in any style of a protective greenhouse, gets the bulk of its energy straight from the sun – rather than from the earth (and fossil fuels).

2. Freshness (5 / 5).  The freshest buds are most often the best. As stated above, the sample was harvested nearly a full year before purchase, so I expected an inferior product – but was very pleasantly surprised. Visual, tactile and olfactory observations all suggested this flower was harvested no more than a month ago.

3. Terpenoids were not quantified, nor qualitatively presented on the Label (0 / 5).

4. Producer failed to list pesticides or claim “No Pesticides Used” on the package label (0 / 5). Inquisitive consumers might visit the grower’s website and find such a claim, but it needs to be stated on the label.

5. Grower has hosted a previous Seattle Bliss tour and inspection (5 / 5).  All producers are given benefit of doubt until decided otherwise.  This means every grower gets these 5-points until we decide at our sole discretion that the points are not deserved.  A brief tour demonstrates compliance with laws and improves consumer confidence.

6. Cannabinoids Labeling, two quantities missing; (3 / 5).  The average consumer wants and needs to know Total THC and Total CBD.  These totals are calculated values based on the loss of the ‘acid’ stub by shedding CO2, and sure enough Total THC is always just a little bit less than THC + THC-A.  Consumers may also care to know how much of each of these active substances were still in the inactive, acid form. The law in Washington requires all four of these to be clearly and accurately quantified. Total Cannabinoids, CBG, CBN, etc., are not required, but may be included on the label as a bonus to the consumer.  This label listed “THC: 23.06% CBD: 0%”, which fails to identify whether quantified THC is actual THC, THC-A, or calculated Total THC.

7. Terpene Presence (5 / 5) is evaluated with the First Sniff and is indicative of Concentration as an undetectable sample would rate at 0 and a very strong one at 5.  Standard sniff evaluation includes the combined sniffing of the newly opened container AND subsequent grinding of 1 gram and sniffing the freshly-ground product. This step is for evaluating the whole buds in the newly opened container. The glass jar had a second, replaceable seal that preserved the sample well.  The first sniff was rich and full of terpenes.

8. Product Purity is evaluated with the First Sniff and Microscopy (5 / 5).  Any impurities may cause an unexpected odor, but should be detectable under the microscope.  None were detected via either detection method.

9. Product Color (4 / 5).  Dense coverage with amber trichome heads may have caused overall color to appear a brown-leaning 'olive drab'.

10. Product Quality is evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  Points can be lost for male flower sites (more common recently due to the feminized seed market), insect or animal evidence, abusive handling, etc.

11. Product Moisture is also evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  The most ideal buds, this sample inclusive, are sponge-like, mostly dry, but a little bit sticky.  The consumer will be able to open a bud, spreading the seedless bracts to reveal and snap the central stem without breaking the bud.  No exception here.

12. Trim Quality (5 / 5).  Sample has had all sugar leaf stems, most pistils and all leaf matter removed; bud stems < 3 mm.

13. Trichome Density (5 / 5).  Flower is densely covered with capitate trichomes.

14. Harvest Timing (4 / 5).  Nearly all glandular heads are amber to dark amber in color, normally indicative of a slightly late harvest (days).

15. Terpene Presence, 2nd Sniff (5 / 5).  This step is for evaluating the freshly-ground buds and should garner a higher rating than the first sniff of the buds (unless both rate 5).

16. Smoke Terpene Presence, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  Sample is rated only upon how fragrant the smoke is; not how well it is liked.  This sample was most delicious.

17. Smoke Smoothness was rated (5 / 5) with no undesired pops, crackles, or unavoidably fast/hot smoke to affect this score.

18. Smoke Pleasantness, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  This evaluation criterion exists because some buds taste/ smell like feces, hay or vomit, perhaps a pesticide or soil amenity influences the taste; the pleasantness of the whole smoke requires rating.

19. Effectiveness (1 / 5).  Dutch Treat being a THC strain with no CBD should be an uplifting charge to one’s creativity, but sometimes puts one ‘in-da-couch’. A rating of five in this case would indicate high potency.  Very little effect – especially any psychoactivity -  was observed (and possible headache per extra ingestion and dehydration in attempt to self-titrate).  This long-cured, "mild high" cannabis would be recommended for bedtime in normal dosage only.  (Learn more about Oxidative Degradation of THC into CBN in Stored Cannabis)

20. Price-Value Rating (PVR), (4 / 5).  PVR is calculated based on the price per gram versus the calculated average price regardless of potency.  As is the case with this sample, those above the average price earn less.  Those equal or under the average get the full five points.

This sample earned an overall rating of 81 out of 100 possible points.  Outdoor cannabis operations, greenhouse grows and those with light-deprivation greenhouses impose a much smaller carbon footprint on the Earth than indoor operations.  This outdoor grower could improve their HigherGround420 rating, comply with existing laws and satisfy the desires of their consumers by making a few changes.

The Producer could easily satisfy the consumer’s desire to know exactly what they are consuming by proactively printing an annually verified terpenoid profile on their package label to earn another 5 points.  Also, other states have their own requirements, but Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) rules state ALL FOUR of the following are required:  “THC concentration (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol) listed as total THC and activated THC-A and CBD concentration (cannabidiol) listed as total CBD and activated CBD-A” (WSLCB rules, https://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=314-55-105 WAC Section 2, a, iv, E).

NOTE: The rules have errors.  Activated THC-A is THC, and activated CBD-A is CBD.  When transcribing these values from the lab report onto your label it is best to transcribe each exactly as the lab has it listed.  THC is activated THC, THC-A is the non-activated, acid form of THC, and so on with CBD.

Not all growers, especially outdoor growers with large harvests to process in just a short few weeks, have their craft ‘dialed-in’ so well.  I found this grow to be smooth and delicious.  I’d recommend those with any tolerance to check dates and stick with the fresher harvests, but sometimes just getting ‘mellow’ can be quite a pleasure.

Thursday, February 14, 2019

2019 Dutch Treat Marijuana Strain Review DT01 by Sky High Gardens



Today’s sample of Dutch Treat as grown by Sky High Gardens, an INDOOR cannabis farm in Seattle, WA, was very likely harvested near December 24, 2017 as the label indicates “Cure Complete: 1/24/2018” and tested at 26.9% Total Cannabinoids. Evaluated at nearly a full year old, here’s how this delicious bud rated with HigherGround420.com.

1. Environmental Stewardship (0 / 5). Indoor cannabis is pretty, but the electricity required to produce it is very costly.  Indoor operations pay large sums for electricity to flower plants under controlled conditions. The market supports the price point at this time, but that may change if sun-grown cannabis comes into fashion with general consumers as it has with connoisseurs.
2. Freshness (5 / 5).  The freshest buds are the best, so since the soonest a producer can get high-quality buds to the retailer is 1 month, a sample being evaluated at 1 month is often at its best.  Most of our field ratings will take place at exactly 1 month after harvest as producers are packaging the product. Sample was 12 months old and appeared as fresh and fragrant as any 1-month sample, thus 5 points.
3. Terpenoids quantified on the Label (4 / 5).  Label has no more than one error or inaccuracy; terpenoids are qualitatively on the label, but less than five terpenoids are individually quantified.  See the terpenoid profile bar graph produced by Jeff Cole in the Seattle Bliss video review .
4. Producer uses no pesticides (5 / 5), holds current certification or passes our inspection, and states this claim (e.g. “No Pesticides Used”) on the package label.
5. Grower has hosted or welcomes a future HigherGround420 tour and inspection (5 / 5).
All producers are given benefit of doubt until decided otherwise.  This means every grower gets these 5-points until we decide at our sole discretion that the points are not deserved.  A brief tour demonstrates compliance with laws and improves consumer confidence.
6. Cannabinoids Labeling, one quantity missing; (4 / 5).  While it is apparent to a trained individual that Total THC in this case is equal to Total Cannabinoids (appearing as I-502 Total here), the average consumer wants to know Total THC. For the sake of clarity to the consumer (not just what the law requires), a perfect five out of five would indicate a very informative label that has no less than ALL FOUR of the following: 1) CBD, CBD-A, or Total CBD, 2) THC or THC-A, 3) Total THC, and 4) Total Cannabinoids (four items: CBD, THC, Total THC, and Total Cannabinoids) clearly and accurately quantified. CBG, CBN, etc. may be included on the label as a bonus.
7. Terpene Presence (5 / 5) is evaluated with the First Sniff and is indicative of Concentration as an undetectable sample would rate at 0 and a very strong one at 5.  Standard sniff evaluation includes the combined sniffing of the newly opened container AND subsequent grinding of 1 gram and sniffing the freshly-ground product. This step is for evaluating the whole buds in the newly opened container. The original 1g sample in this case was inadequate for complete objectivity.  A second sample of the same crop was purchased in a larger 3.5g size. As a result, future HigherGround420 evaluations nationwide will be standardized upon the 3.5g package size.
Sample DT01 at 400X magnification.
8. Product Purity is evaluated with the First Sniff and Microscopy (5 / 5).  Any impurities may cause an unexpected odor, but should be detectable under the microscope.  None were detected via either detection method.
9. Product Color (5 / 5).  The intensity of green color in the epidermis of cannabis flowers is an indicator of plant vigor, which could be due to nitrogen availability during late flower, and translates to elevated chlorophyll concentration (R.C. Clarke, 1981). The more white flowers have matured and cured slowly, then allowed chlorophyll harshness to dissipate. Flowers white with trichomes can achieve top ratings here, too. Product is evaluated again for smoothness in the final smoking steps.
10. Product Quality is evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  Points can be lost for male flower sites (more common recently due to the feminized seed market), insect or animal evidence, abusive handling, etc.
11. Product Moisture is also evaluated during bud inspection (5 / 5).  The most ideal buds, this sample inclusive, are sponge-like, mostly dry, but a little bit sticky.  The consumer will be able to open a bud, spreading the seedless bracts to reveal and snap the central stem without breaking the bud.
12. Trim Quality (5 / 5).  Sample has had all sugar leaf stems, most pistils and all leaf matter removed; bud stems < 3 mm.
13. Trichome Density (5 / 5).  Flower is densely covered with capitate trichomes.
14. Harvest Timing (5 / 5).  Over 66% (two thirds) of glandular heads are milky-white or turning amber, Less than 33% (one third) are dark amber in color; few clear:  5.
15. Terpene Presence, 2nd Sniff (5 / 5).  This step is for evaluating the freshly-ground buds and should garner a higher rating than the first sniff of the buds (unless both rate 5).
16. Smoke Terpene Presence, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  Sample was rated only upon how fragrant the smoke was; not how well it was liked, though it was most delicious.
17. Smoke Smoothness was rated (5 / 5) with no undesired pops, crackles, or unavoidably fast/hot smoke to affect this score.
18. Smoke Pleasantness, 1st, 2nd taste (5 / 5).  This evaluation criterion exists because some buds taste/ smell like feces, hay or vomit, perhaps a pesticide or soil amenity influences the taste; the pleasantness of the whole smoke requires rating.
19. Effectiveness (5 / 5).  Dutch Treat being a THC strain with no CBD was quite effective. A rating of five in this case indicates a high potency.
20. Price-Value Rating (PVR), (0 / 5).  PVR is calculated based on the price per gram versus the calculated average price regardless of potency.  As is the case with this sample, those equal or above the average price earn 0.  Those under the average are scored according to the richness of the value.

Score of 87

This sample earned an overall rating of 87 out of 100 possible points.  Outdoor cannabis operations, greenhouse grows and those with light-deprivation greenhouses impose a much smaller carbon footprint on the Earth.  This indoor operation could earn up to 5 points on the HigherGround420 scale for better Earth Stewardship. The Producer could also easily satisfy the consumer’s desire to know exactly what they are consuming by proactively printing an annually verified terpenoid profile on their package label to earn another 5 points.  Also, other states have other requirements, but Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) rules state ALL FOUR of the following are required:  “THC concentration (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol) listed as total THC and activated THC-A and CBD concentration (cannabidiol) listed as total CBD and activated CBD-A” (WSLCB rules, https://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=314-55-105 WAC Section 2, a, iv, E).

NOTE: The WSLCB rules have errors.  Activated THC-A is THC, and activated CBD-A is CBD.  When transcribing these values from the lab report onto your label it is best to transcribe each exactly as the lab has it listed.  THC is activated THC, THC-A is the non-activated, acid form of THC, and so on with CBD.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Research notes_Terpenoids in lemon peel

Limonene Dominance

Lemon peel oil cold pressed from different origins is approximately 61% limonene, 17% beta pinene, and 9% gamma terpinene (Weiss, 1997)



Ratios: 7 units limonene : 2 units β-pinene : 1 unit γ-terpinene

How does this profile compare to that of a limonene- dominant cannabis strain, such as Lemon OG or Super Lemon Haze?  We shall see...

I thought it particularly interesting that there is no mixture of Pinenes in lemon peel as we regularly see in cannabis. This simply suggests a different metabolic pathway (enzyme) creates this pinene than does the same in cannabis.

Mint Terpenoids 

Limonene 
Menthol
Mapping of (-) - Limonene [the "negative" stereoisomer] rearrangement to (-) - Menthol and related end products (Croteau, 1987) demonstrates the menthol pathway's dependence on limonene as its substrate. It is reasonable to believe that those varietals possessing the menthol enzyme translated in great enough saturation will keep the substrate, limonene, nearly exhausted.

[figure in production]

References
Weiss, E. A. (1997) Essential oil crops, Cab international, Wallingford.

Croteau, R. (1987). Biosynthesis and catabolism of monoterpenoids. Chemical Reviews, 87(5), 929-954.

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Seattle Bliss SESH at Fairview Park

THE SESH (Dec 31, 2018)
Jeff and Hope take a moment at Fairview Park on Lake Union to discuss finding one's strain and grower, and an invitation for guests on the show.

To be a guest on an upcoming program, or to contact us with story tips:
seattlebliss1@gmail.com


Monday, December 31, 2018

Seattle Bliss 2019 SOTM Dutch Treat DT07

"The Seventh Strain" sounds like something ominous, but it's really just the seventh sample of Dutch Treat available in Seattle during our tiny purchase window.  Some growers didn't have DT in Seattle at that time and are conspicuously missing.  Maybe next year.

Take a look!  Enjoy the video and microscopy!  The full report is almost ready.  Thank you, subscribers!  Single copies (digital or print) will be available at Amazon.com.  Summary video coming soon.

Become a legitimate subscriber by visiting the MEMBERSHIP page here at SeattleBliss.com.